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MoveOn.org: Democracy in Action
 
Past Press Coverage:
 

To See MoveOn.org Political Action Press, click here

Reuters, March 24, 2003

MoveOn group taking online activism to bookstores 

NEW YORK (Reuters) - MoveOn.org, a grass-roots group that promotes liberal causes from its Web site, is reaching out beyond the Internet to the more traditional medium of books with a political how-to guide for local activists.

"MoveOn's 50 Ways to Love Your Country," to be published on April 1 by the small, independent Inner Ocean Publishing of Hawaii, was fourth on the Amazon.com list on Wednesday even though a promotional push for the book by group members had barely begun.

The book represents a "crossing of the digital divide" by moving from the Internet into bookstores that often serve as community centers, said the book's publisher, Karen Bouris, in a telephone interview from her office on the island of Maui.

MoveOn has attracted more than 2 million members and raised millions of dollars to back political campaigns and projects.

Sections of the book are introduced by former Vice President Al Gore, California Democratic Rep. Nancy Pelosi and author Gail Sheehy. The essays share personal experiences and practical advice ranging from "Write an Op-Ed Letter" to "Start a Petition," which chronicles a couple's quest to protect endangered wolves in Alaska.

"It's about participating in our democracy in a positive way, not bashing," Bouris said. "The more informed, the more we feel our voices and actions can and do make a difference, the better country we'll have."

==

Salon.com 12/1/03

Bill O'Reilly wants its nonprofit status revoked. Republican National Committee chairman Ed Gillespie sees it as part of the "Democrat plan to subvert campaign finance laws." House Majority Leader Tom DeLay's office plays phone pranks on its staffers. A piece in David Horowitz's FrontPage Magazine worries: "It could bypass the mainstream media, sneak around campaign spending limits, and become its own powerful channel for Leftist communication, indoctrination and mobilization."

Clearly, MoveOn.org has arrived...

...MoveOn appears to be at the hub of a new political synergy that may give the Democrats their best hope for defeating incumbent Republican George W. Bush in 2004. All this has the right worried. MoveOn, they know, is part of a massive campaign gearing up to try to beat Bush in 2004.

"I think there are cranks on all sides," says (co-founder Wes) Boyd. "The cranks are running the show on one side. People who 10 years ago, 15 years ago would have been laughed off Capitol Hill have, through having a very strong, consistent voice in an environment in which there's a vacuum of integrity, have gained ownership of one team. But it's a very fragile alignment. If you look at Americans' issue positions, they don't align with the Bush administration. My view is that Americans are very centrist. When you go out and talk to people, I share views with a lot of people across the country." That center has been obscured by television, which thrives on rancor and outrage. But Boyd believes the Internet is beginning to counteract some of television's distortions. "The American people are smart, talented, resourceful, all of those good things," he says. "Right now with technology, we can tap into that resourcefulness; we can help play a catalytic role in helping to get these people to step forward. That's what you're seeing with MoveOn.

==

CQ Weekly 10/4/03

Capitol Hill again took note when MoveOn got behind a campaign to roll back new Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rules to relax media ownership limits. In three days, the group collected 351,600 signatures on petitions opposing the rules, which organizers delivered to the leaders of the Senate effort to reverse the regulations, Byron L. Dorgan , D-N.D., and Trent Lott , R-Miss.

Dorgan and Lott were happy to use the stacks of petitions as a prop at a news conference Sept. 11, piling them shoulder-high on each side of a lectern. The image reinforced their point that the rule change - far from an esoteric issue important only to industry insiders - matters to a wide swath of the American public. And five days later the Senate passed a measure ( S J Res 17 ) to block the FCC rules. (CQ Weekly, p. 2303 )

Dorgan and Lott, like Byrd, did not anticipate MoveOn's appeal and the boost it gave them. "It was a pleasant surprise," Dorgan said.

==

Washington Post 6/5/03:

In the season of their discontent -- out of power and on the defensive -- Democrats are looking for inspiration and leadership. A bunch of them found
it yesterday in the unassuming figure of Wes Boyd, the man who gave America the flying toaster.

Boyd and his wife, Joan Blades, made a fortune with their winged-appliance computer screen savers. Then, in 1998, appalled by the impeachment struggle in Washington, the Californians founded MoveOn.org, a modest online petition effort that has grown into the hottest political organization in American progressive circles.

From an initial e-mail to about 300 friends, MoveOn has, five years later, a "membership" of 1.4 million Americans, plus 700,000 more people outside the country. The MoveOn political action committee has raised $6.5 million for like-minded candidates and has hopes of doubling that amount in this election cycle. MoveOn generated a million phone calls and e-mails to Congress protesting the Iraq war and catalyzed thousands of candlelight vigils around the world. "Even we were shocked by the power of this," Boyd said. "We were bowled over."

==

 
CNN: JUDY WOODRUFF'S INSIDE POLITICS
9/4/03

SCHNEIDER: Democrats are keeping a list of grievances, call it the four "R's."

Let's hear it from one aggrieved Democrat.

GOV. GRAY DAVIS (D), CALIFORNIA: It started with the impeachment of President Clinton, when the Republicans could not beat him in 1996.

SCHNEIDER: First "R," removal.

DAVIS: It continued in Florida, where they stopped the vote count, depriving thousands of Americans of the right to vote.

SCHNEIDER: Second "R," recount.

DAVIS: This year, they're trying to steal additional Congressional seats in Colorado and Texas, overturning legal redistricting plans.

SCHNEIDER: Third "R," redistricting.

DAVIS: Here in California, the Republicans lost the governor's race last November. Now they're trying to use this recall to seize control of California just before the next presidential election.

SCHNEIDER: Recall. That makes four. That same list appears in a new moveon.org newspaper ad. Clinton, Florida, recall, redistricting.

The idea is to revive Democrats' outrage over impeachment and Florida and stoke it with new grievances.

Republicans say the four "R's" are really two "P's" pessimism and protest, a destructive kind of politics.

But Democrats see it as a way to rally the base for 2004. They see the hand of one sinister figure behind all those grievances, the fifth "R."

RODNEY ELLIS (D), TEXAS STATE SENATE: Karl Rove, a government employee, has made calls to members of the Texas Republican leadership saying, We want additional seats in Congress, so you all need to go through a redistricting again.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

SCHNEIDER: Call it Rove rage. Democrats are counting on it to bring their supporters to the polls next year. Votes "R" us. How about that?

 

 
MoveOn Members Hold Vigils Honoring the 1000 Killed in Iraq
The Delaware County Times
9/10/04
  Anti-war protesters light up the night sky
Des Moines Register
9/10/04
  Iowans at vigil honor nation's fallen soldiers
Ithaca Journal
9/10/04
  Vigil honors fallen soldiers, Iraqis
Michigan Daily
9/10/04
  Iraq vigil honors 1,000 dead soldiers
Wired News
7/21/04
  MoveOn Moves Up in the World
The Guardian
7/21/04
  Fox News reported to TV watchdog
The Guardian
7/21/04
  Fox News documentary tops Amazon sales chart
Editor & Publisher
7/19/04
  Activists Ask FTC to Take Action Against Fox News
Boston Herald
6/28/04
  Moore-ality plays?
Japan Today
6/26/04
  Internet revolutionizing American politics
Washington Post
6/23/04
  Quality of New Jobs Is Focus of Election-Year Debate
Chicago Sun Times
5/27/04
  'How dare they subject us to such dishonor!'
New York Times
5/2/04
  Making Book on the Bush Presidency, at Amazon.com
Alternet
3/25/04
  Tuna on White -- Hold the Mercury
Reuters
3/24/04
  MoveOn Group Taking Online Activism to Bookstores
The Harvard Crimson
3/24/04
  Website Encourages Political Involvement
Environmental Media Services
3/23/04
  Bush's Next Arsenic?
TomPaine.com
3/18/04
  Onward Deaniacs
LA Times
3/18/04
  Campaign Opens for Censure of Bush
NY Times
3/17/04
  Bush Glad to Be in the Campaign Fray and Not Above It
Common Dreams
3/17/04
  Coalition Critical of White House Deceptions Delivers 560,340 Petition Signatures to House Offices As Members Debate Resolution on the War
SF Chronicle
3/17/04
  New anti-Bush ads assail president on economy, Iraq war
Rueters
3/17/04
  Anti-War Activists Call for Bush Censure Over Iraq
Washington Post
3/16/04
  Democrats Match Bush Ad Campaign in Key States
CBS News
3/7/04
  Digital Democracy
Yahoo News
3/3/04
  MoveOn.org Voter Fund Refutes RNC Chair's False Claims
NY Times
1/30/04
  A Super Bowl Deficit
Newsweek
1/30/04
  Censored at the Super Bowl
LA Times

1/30/04

  One Thing That Won't Be Tackled on Sunday: Issues
Oakland Tribune
1/30/04
  Democrats say CBS panders to GOP
Boston Globe
1/29/04
  Political Football
The Nation
1/28/04
  "Exhibit A Against Media Concentration"
NY Times
1/18/04
  Ad Rejections by CBS Raise Policy Questions
The Forward
1/16/04
  GOP Won't Rap Shoah Language Of Republicans
FAIR
1/16/04
  When Are Nazi Comparisons Deplorable?
Newsweek
1/15/04
  Gore Gets Green, Rough and Righteous
Common Dreams
1/15/04
  Gore Blasts Bush Space Plan, Says Earth Neglected
CNN
1/15/04
  Gore blasts Bush on environment
Washington Post
1/15/04
  Gore Calls Bush a 'Moral Coward'
Village Voice
1/14/04
  MoveOn Ad Competition Ushers Bush Attacks Into the Mainstream
AlterNet
1/14/04
  Taking It to the People
Reuters
1/13/04
  MoveOn Puts Power of Internet to Use in Politics
AlterNet
1/13/04
  Nazis For President?
LA Times
1/13/04
  TV Spot on Deficit Wins MoveOn's Bush-Bashing Contest
CNN
1/13/04
  Ad showing children laboring to pay off deficit wins MoveOn contest
SF Chronicle
1/13/04
  Anti-Bush ad contest proves popular online
Guardian
1/13/04
  MoveOn Political Group Picks Winning Ad
Silicon Valley News
1/11/04
  Putting ads in the hands of the public
Miami Herald
1/10/04
  MoveOn.org Becomes Anti-Bush Powerhouse
NY Times
1/6/04
  Critics Attack Efforts to Link Bush and Hitler
USA Today
1/6/04
  MoveOn.org winnows hundreds of anti-Bush ads to 15
Biloxi Sun Herald (AP)

1/6/04

  Web Site Compiles Pile of Anti-Bush Ads
BBC News
1/5/04
  Bush ad contest names finalists
SF Chronicle

1/5/04

  Advocacy group winnows hundreds of anti-Bush ads to 15
St. Petersburg Times
12/26/03
  Political Ads Go POP
San Jose Mercury News
12/24/03
  Celebrating holidays as season of sharing
NY Times
12/21/03
  On the Web, an Amateur Audience Creates Anti-Bush Ads
Alternet
12/18/03
  MoveOn on the Ground
U.S. Newswire
12/18/03
  MoveOn.org Voter Fund, Environment2004 to Fight Bush Administration's Dirty Air Agenda
Fort Worth Star-Telegram
12/15/03
  National Digest
Salon.com (subscription)
12/09/03
  Now playing in 2,600 home theaters: Bush's lies about Iraq
LA Times (subscription)
12/09/03
  MoveOn redefines party politics
LA Times (subscription)
12/08/03
  Iraq Antiwar Film Is Viewed Across U.S.
Rolling Stone
12/05/03
  Moby Hosts Anti-War Screening
Washington Post
12/05/03
  Why I Gave, by George Soros
Guardian UK
12/03/03
  MoveOn Spending $1.9M on Anti-Bush Ads
Alternet
12/02/03
  Bringing Down the House
Common Dreams
12/01/03
  Liberals Finding their Voice
Salon.com (subscription)

11/30/03

  MoveOn moves up
The Hill
11/25/03
  To torture Marshall McLuhan ...
Washington Post
11/24/03
  MoveOn Ads Take On Bush's Economic Record
San Francisco Chronicle
11/23/03
  MoveOn, a political force online, receives $5 million matching gift
LA Times
11/22/03
  Republicans Launch Ad to Counter Anti-Bush Spots
Alameda Times-Star
11/22/03
  Not much of a benefit
FOX News (AP)
11/21/03
  Online Opponents Slam Bush Over Job Losses
International Herald Tribune
11/18/03
  Internet-based group becomes political force
NY Times
11/18/03
  Net Group Tries to Click Democrats to Power
CNN
11/18/03
  MoveOn's big moment
LA Times
11/13/03
  An 'Uncovered' look at war
Washington Post
11/9/03
  Gore Criticizes Bush Approach to Security
CNN
11/9/03
  Gore accuses Bush of undermining freedoms
ABC News
11/9/03
  Gore Accuses Bush of 'Big Brother' Policy
Colombia Journalism Review
11/6/03
  Tripping Up Big Media
NY Times
11/5/03
  A Screening With Stars but a Focus on Politics
The Guardian
11/5/03
  Bush wins $87bn to keep up fight in Iraq
Working for Change
11/4/03
  BuzzFlash interview: Robert Greenwald
Alternet
11/3/03
  Lies, Lies, and More Lies
Alternet
11/2/03
  The Revolution Will Be Televised
Rolling Stone
10/31/03
  News and Features
In These Times
10/28/03
  From the Screen to the Streets
The Nation
10/23/03
  Many Peaces, One War
Washington Post
10/22/03
  Online Group Protests on the Street
Cybercast News Service
10/22/03
  Liberal Group Conducts Its Own Leak Probe
National Journal
10/18/03
  Lobbying and Law - Digital Democrats 'Move On'
Congressional Quarterly Weekly
10/4/03
  Internet-Based Activist Group Puts Powerful Spin on Politics
Guardian
9/27/03
  'You lied, they died,' US parents tell Bush
MSNBC
9/5/03
  Campaign Kickoff
Fort Worth Star Telegram
9/4/03
  Holdouts go on the attack in D.C.
CNN.com
9/4/03
  Texas Democrats say Bush is part of GOP power grab
Fort Worth Star Telegram
9/4/03
  Redistricting battle shifts to Washington
San Antonio Express News
9/4/03
  Democrats target Bush on remap
Fort Worth Star Telegram
9/3/03
  Texas Democrats to make pitch in D.C.
San Francisco Chronicle
8/24/03
  Texas senate Democrats in self-imposed exile get support from national fund-raising effort
News8 Austin
8/23/03
  Activist group collects more than $800,000
Washington Post
8/23/03
  Fugitive Texas Democrats Helped by Web Drive
San Antonio Express News
8/23/03
  Ad blitz set for AWOL Demos
TomPaine.com
9/4/03
  Bush Moves On
ABC News
9/3/03
  No Schwarzenegger in Calif. Recall Debate
Boston Globe
8/7/03
  Net gains
First came information, then opinion. The Internet's next step may be electing a president
The Nation
8/21/03
  The Online Beat
San Jose Mercury News
8/13/03
  In Oakland, lawmakers urge investigation of Iraq war
NY Times
8/7/03
  Back in Fray, Gore Urges Voters to Fire Bush
ABC News
8/7/03
  Gore Assails Bush Policies in U.S., Iraq
Washington Post
8/7/03
  Gore Says Bush Has Misled Americans
The Nation
8/7/03
  Al Gore Moves On
Chicago Tribune
8/7/03
  Gore rips White House policies
AlterNet
8/7/03
  Setting It Right
Bloomberg.com
8/7/03
  Gore Says Bush Misled the Public on Iraq, Economy
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
8/7/03
  Gore: Bush 'just dead wrong'
PBS: The News Hour
8/5/03
  PLUGGED-IN POLITICS
Longview, TX News-Journal
7/26/03
  Views Vary As Americans Digest Iraq War
AlterNet
7/25/03
  The Web Wires the Movement
Washington Post
7/24/03
  A Slap at the Media
Washington Post
7/22/03
  Antiwar Groups Say Public Ire Over Iraq Claims Is Increasing
Radio Free Europe
7/15/03
  U.S.: False Iraq Report, American Casualties Tarnishing Bush's Popularity
LA Times
7/15/03
  Bush Backs U.S. Intelligence as Questions Persist
Boston Globe
7/15/03
  Ads say Bush lied about Iraq
Washington Post
7/14/03
  Anti-Bush Ads Hit TV
CNN
7/14/03
  Bush says Iraq WMD proof will come
Guardian UK
7/14/03
  Bush Defends Intelligence As 'Darn Good'
USA Today
7/10/03
  Democratic TV ad says Bush misled U.S. on Iraq
Canada.com
7/9/03
  Amid calls for inquiry, Bush defends his use of false intelligence on Iraq
MSNBC/Washington Post
7/9/03
For Democrats, energy is coming from the left
Atlantic Monthly
7/9/03
  Connecting With the Wired Left
LA Times
7/7/03
  With Click of a Mouse, Liberals Find Answer to Limbaugh
Washington Post
6/26/03
  One Click Politics
TomPaine.com
6/24/03
  In Bush We Trust?
Boston Globe
6/20/03
  Antiwar groups turn their focus to Bush
American Prospect
6/19/03
  Media Prevent: Will a Senate committee vote today to roll back the FCC's recent deregulation decision?
In These Times
6/16/03
  Needed: A Vast Liberal Conspiracy
Oakland Tribune
6/6/03
  Web awards direct from cyberspace
Washington Post
6/5/03
  From Screen Savers to Progressive Savior?
Washington Post
6/2/03
  Michael Powell and the FCC: Giving Away the Marketplace of Ideas
Working for Change
6/2/03
  Reclaiming hope: The peace movement after the war
TomPaine.com
6/2/03
  Mega Media Madness
San Francisco Chronicle
5/30/03
  S.F. picketers protest vote on new FCC rules - Plan to relax monopoly restrictions
Wired News
5/30/03
  Media More Diverse? Not Really
Guardian
5/29/03
  'Anti mogul' campaign targets Murdoch
Reuters
5/29/03
  Ads pillory Rupert Murdoch on media consolidation
NY Times
5/29/03
  Putting a Face to a Cause
Boston Globe
5/28/03
  Diversity is squashed in FCC rules change
Cybercast News Service
5/28/03
  Groups Warn FCC About Media Ownership Rules Changes
NY Times
5/27/03
  Ideologically Broad Coalition Assails F.C.C. Media Plan
San Antonio Express News
5/27/03
  Activists speak out at Clear Channel
Washington Post
5/27/03
  FCC Bid to Alter Media Rules Spurs Free-Speech Debate
Time Magazine
5/25/03
 
Washington Post
5/25/03
  What the FCC Has Heard So Far
Denver Post
5/22/03
 
Wall Street Journal
5/21/03
  Byrd Unleashes Oratorical Fury, Wins Fans by Goading Colleagues
NPR: Morning Edition
5/21/03
  FCC Plan to Ease Media Ownership Rules Criticized (audio file)    
The Nation
5/15/03
  FCC: Public Be Damned
The Oregonian
5/14/03
 
Washington Post
5/14/03
 
Washington Post
5/14/03
  Liberal Group Fights Tax Cut
ABC News
5/14/03
 
CNN.com
5/13/03
  Ad critical of Bush rejected by Cable provider
Chicago Sun Times
5/14/03
  Don't let GOP give away the bank
SF Chronicle
5/12/03
  AFTERMATH OF WAR
Internet changes the way United States experience war
Mother Jones
5/6/03
  Virtual Peacenik
Washington Post
5/4/03
  The War's Over, But the Fighting's Getting Worse
Local Press Coverage - January, 2003 Congressional Meetings: Click here

Historical Press Coverage:

MoveOn started as an online petition asking the Congress to "censure Pres. Clinton and move on to pressing issues facing the nation." By the end of the impeachment scandal over 500,000 people had signed the petition and many had pledged money for the election to come. The following excerpts describe that time in MoveOn's history:
If the Democrats take control of the House, MoveOn.org will share in the credit. Targeting 28 races, including several "battleground" seats, the network has raised more than $1.85 million in contributions from 43,232 individuals. "Looks like we'll exceed $2 million," Blades says. Such political fundraising is an antidote to the corporate PACs and other large special-interest contributions that are "really distorting the process in a rather disturbing way," Blades adds. "These are regular people, average people, saying 'We want people reflecting our values to represent us.'"
- The Industry Standard / October 30, 2000 (full text of article online)
 
One of the first online political action committees, MoveOn.org, has raised about $1.7 million for 29 Democratic candidates on an issue that has largely disappeared as a major political issue -- the impeachment of President Clinton. Created in September 1998, before fundraising online had caught on as an essential campaign tool, two software developers, Wes Boyd and Joan Blades, created MoveOn to urge House lawmakers to quickly resolve the impeachment issue. By July 1999, the web site had raised $350,000, the first time in politics anyone had been able to raise six figures on the Internet, and the money has kept pouring in. "The great thing about the $1.7 million is that it came from 40,000 individual contributors and so we are really bringing the small donor to these campaigns in a way that has never been done before," said Boyd. "MoveOn is the PAC of the future, if we are lucky. They permit donors to select which candidates (from an approved list) get their money. Small donors getting involved invigorates democracy," said Mike Cornfield, a professor at George Washington's School of Political Management.
- National Journal / October 18, 2000
 
It sounded like a good idea at the time. But nearly a year and a half after a political action committee was formed to protect the House impeachment managers from an expected backlash in the 2000 elections, it is on the brink of collapse, a victim of political winds that have shifted dramatically in the past year... As of the end of June, it had raised a total of $76,787 and had only doled out a single contribution to a Member, a $1,000 check to Rep. Jim Rogan (R-Calif.), a vocal impeachment manager who is in serious jeopardy of losing his seat... In contrast with the House Impeachment Managers PAC, MoveOn.org an online fundraising effort dedicated to defeating incumbents who voted to impeach Clinton, has raked in $1.5 million since it was created last year and currently ranks 16th in overall PAC receipts.
- National Journal / October 16, 2000
 
Witness also the rise of grassroots organizations developed solely on the Internet. Last year, MoveOn.org was an Internet startup created in a home office with no funding. In less than 12 weeks, this grassroots guerilla enterprise signed up over 500,000 supporters and received pledges of $13 million. Frankly, this one web upstart was more effective than many established organizations can claim in a year's worth of effort.
- Republican National Committee web site / April 20, 2000 (full text at rnc.org website)
 
MoveOn made the world of campaign strategists sit up and take notice last winter when its appeals over the Internet quickly attracted $13 million in pledges to support candidates running against impeachment backers. Last June, it set records for online fund raising by collecting more than $250,000 in just five days, mostly in donations under $50. Political pros were dazzled by MoveOn's demonstration of the Internet's potential to magnify the electoral clout of donors with small purses...
"It's 2000," says Wesley Boyd, a successful software entrepreneur based in Berkeley, Calif., and one of MoveOn's founders. "It's time to go." The organization has so far collected a total of $456,000 for its five candidates. But before votes are cast this fall it hopes to raise millions more for as many as 40 candidates across the country, and to deploy thousands of volunteers in their campaigns. MoveOn's strategy is to target competitive races where its involvement could actually make a difference. If MoveOn were to achieve its ambitious goals, it just might have a big impact on this year's struggle to control Congress, especially the House. Republicans hold only a slim five-vote majority there, and the outcome will "likely be determined in no more than three dozen congressional districts," says Thomas Mann, director of governmental studies at the Brookings Institution, a Washington think tank.
- Wall Street Journal / January 31, 2000
 
When Joan Blades and Wes Boyd, husband-and-wife software developers in Silicon Valley, set out on the Internet to protest the congressional impeachment process last fall, they had no idea what they were unleashing. Within days, the couple had generated 500,000 electronic petitions, so many that they had to be parceled out to avoid choking the computer servers on Capitol Hill. When they put out a plea for campaign contributions to help defeat lawmakers who pushed for impeaching President Clinton, they got back an astounding $13 million in pledges for the coming year. It's a sign, political experts say, that the Internet is a new wave in politics, one that could rival or surpass the impact of TV. From the Nixon-Kennedy debate in 1960 to present-day negative ads, TV remade political discourse into an exchange of sound bites and drove up the cost of campaigning. The Internet holds the potential to counter both those effects.
- USA Today Cover Story / September 1, 1999
 
Last December, at a Harvard University conference on online politics, Joan Blades held forth on her vision for the Internet. She spoke about returning power to ordinary citizens, moving politics beyond confrontation and the glories of community. It struck some of us in attendance as fuzzy-wuzzy. When she finished speaking, Rich Galen of GOPAC cracked, "Kumbaya.org," and the back of the room collapsed in laughter. We're not laughing now. MoveOn.org, run by Blades and her partner Wes Boyd, raised $250,000 in a five-day burst before the June 30 FEC filing deadline. That crushed the record for online fundraising. But the way they did it may be far more significant than the amount.
- Michael Cornfield, September Issue Bandwagon/Campaigns & Elections
 
Politics on the Internet turned a corner in recent weeks, and neither democracy nor cyberspace may be the same again... MoveOn.org announced that they had raised $250,000 in five days via the Internet and bundled the money to five Democratic congressional candidates, four of whom are challenging pro-impeachment Republican incumbents. A week later the figure was $358,000 and still climbing. The average contribution was less than $50... And that, political professionals say, would be nothing short of revolutionary. If candidates can use the Internet to raise significant funds through small donations and attract and organize volunteers at relatively little cost and labor, it could radically alter the balance of power in politics... "If you have lots and lots of small contributions you really are not beholden to anybody but the broad public interest," said Harvard University professor Elaine Kamarck...
- Scripps Howard News Service / July 22, 1999
 
Thousand of Internet users, fed up with the impeachment process, have gone online in the past three weeks and pledged more than $10 million to try to defeat the politicians they believe have ignored voters' wishes to censure President Clinton and move on to other business, the operators of a new grassroots Web site say.
- New York Times / January 8, 1999 (full text of article online)
 
As Senators plot the shape and scale of a Senate impeachment trial against President Clinton, an Internet-based group dedicated to ending the proceedings is stepping up its activism and promising to punish impeachment-minded lawmakers in the next election."
- Los Angeles Times / January 13, 1999
 
How can there be such a phenomenon as electronic political activism? What's so active about clicking a mouse button when sending an e-mail or logging on to a Web site? But with $13 million and more than 650,000 volunteer hours pledged to Censure and Move On, a grass-roots Internet campaign against the impeachment trial of President Clinton, the realm of political activism now must bend its boundaries to include cyberspace.
- Washington Post / February 1, 1999
 
MoveOn.org, the Web site that made news last year when it drew some 450,000 signatures to an online petition calling Congress to "censure President Clinton and move on," on Friday announced a new online lobbying initiative: a gun control petition. In the aftermath of the school shootings in Littleton, Colo., MoveOn.org co-founder Wes Boyd said the site's "Gun Safety First" petition pressures Congress to regulate guns for safety like other consumer products, institute child safety standards for gun manufacturers and force gun show operators to check buyers' backgrounds.
- ZDNet / April 30, 1999 (full text of article online)
 
In response to this month's massacre at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., Joan Blades and Wes Boyd started an online gun control drive on their Web site, www.moveon.org, last Thursday night. By yesterday, they had gathered more than 42,000 signatures... The new "Gun Safety First" campaign promotes the "commonsense regulation of firearms," such as child safety standards for gun manufacturers and laws forcing gun-show operatiors to enact more stringent background checks on buyers. "It's another issue where a vast majority of citizens want reasonable gun control but what's happening inside the Beltway in not reflecting that desire," Blades said. "This is an opportunity for people who are concerned to become an effective voice."
- San Francisco Chronicle / May 5, 1999
 
Representative Carolyn B. Maloney, D-N.Y., received 3,121 e-mails from Move On, more than any House member. Maloney's press secretary, Terese Schlachter, said the e-mails did bolster Maloney's decision to stick with the Democrats and vote for a limited inquiry.
- San Francisco Chronicle / October 15, 1998
 
(Congressman Bart Stupak) is emboldened by 205 e-mails that have come into his office over the past 36 hours arguing for Congress to Censure President Clinton and move on "to pressing issues facing the country." He tells two of his Michigan delegation colleagues, Lynn Rivers and Debbie Stabenow, of his decision. He shares it with Bonior because "I was probably the last holdout."
- Washington Post / October 9, 1998
 
A new grassroots organization aims to leverage the Internet to ask Congress to "immediately censure President Clinton and move on to pressing issues facing the country."
- CNN Interactive / September 26, 1998
 
Those who are simply tired of partisan bickering can wend their way to Huffington's neighbors at Moveon.org and exhort Congress to "immediately censure President Clinton and Move On to pressing issues facing the country."
- Salon / September 26, 1998
 
Just how powerful is the Net as a grass-roots political tool? Joan Blades and Wes Boyd plan to find out. On Tuesday, the two founders of Berkeley Systems, known for its best-selling After Dark screen savers, posted a petition on the Web (www.moveon.org) inviting fellow citizens to express collective disgust at Washington's protracted preoccupation with President Clinton's relationship with Monica Lewinsky and to urge Congress to turn its attention to more important matters.
- New York Times / September 24, 1998
 
Censure and Move On, a bipartisan group formed last weekend, hopes to gather megabytes worth of 'signatures' to force a quick congressional censure vote.
- San Jose Mercury / September 24, 1998
 
(Censure and Move On) petitions for Clinton's censure and urges "government to get back to work."
- San Francisco Chronicle / September 24, 1998
 
Blades and husband, Wes Boyd, founded the 'purely volunteer effort' and its site, www.moveon.org, after finding themselves talking to citizens around the country who felt that their representatives in Congress were not listening to their desire to move past the Lewinsky incident.
- The Industry Standard / September 24, 1998